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How to Cultivate an Open Heart in a Time of Uncertainty and Bewilderment

Date : February 20,2019

Location: OMA offices , 150 Bloor Street West,suite 900, Toronto

Time: 7:30-9:30 pm  Meeting is free 

RSVP: pcmhsection@gmail.com or Ana/Ada at 416/229-2399 ext. 125

Facilitated by Harry Zeit MD and Irina Dumitrache CYT

One of the most profound challenges of working in the healthcare professions lies in the necessity of ongoing exposure to the hurt and suffering of those for whom we care. If we attempt to protect ourselves from the possibility of triggering our own trauma, or facing overwhelm, we risk shutting down our hearts and our connections to family, friends and colleagues. If we force ourselves to stay too open, without staying grounded in compassion and somatically resourced with appropriate tools, we risk being overwhelmed – and even colonized – by the suffering of others.

In The Heart of Trauma, Bonnie Badenoch writes: “When our systems protectively turn our minds and hearts away from the truth of the moment, there is a moment of isolation from ourselves and others that may increase our sense of despair. However, when we come into contact with suffering in the presence of another, even when the depth of pain is very great, the very experience of relatedness – the nurturance we humans most need – prepares a space in which meaning and hope may emerge.”

Come share an evening with us where we cultivate a space for the emergence of compassion, hope and meaning-making. We will be continuing to explore resilience, looking at ways in which we can access strength and courage, while staying heart-opened and available to ourselves and our communities.

Our series follows trauma-informed principles. Whether you are doing well, or struggling with your own hurt, we welcome you to this Caring for Self while Caring for Others presentation.

In this workshop, attendees will:
Gain a deeper and embodied understanding of compassion, self-compassion and shame resilience.
Deepen their understanding of the mind/body origins of burnout and to better understand how not all current interventions are necessarily helpful.
Learn resources that support and safely sustain compassion and an open heart in the face of adversity.
Continue to work with developing resilience-based somatic resources.
Practice an experiential exercise to cultivate heart-opening.

We hope to see you there!

Sincerely,
The Education Committee of the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

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Approach to PTSD in Primary Care

 


Date :     Wednesday,  February 13th, 2019,

Location:   OMA Offices, 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 900, Toronto

Time:          7:30pm – 9:30pm

Who is invited: All Physicians, Residents, and Medical Students

Registration: Free for all Physicians, Residents, and Medical Students, hosted by the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

 

To register, please contact  : Ada/ Anna at pcmhsection@gmail.com  or  416-229-2399  ext. 125

 

Dr. Susan Abbey is Psychiatrist in Chief at the University Health Network and a full professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Abbey has received numerous academic awards and honors, and has presented abstracts and lectures at over 300 meetings and conferences nationally and internationally.

Approved for 2 hrs of MDPAC Group CE

By the end of the session participants will be able to:

  1. Describe possible psychiatric responses to trauma
  2. Describe the common treatment approaches to PTSD
  3. List ways in which the primary care practitioner can provide trauma-informed physical and mental health care.

 

 

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Diversity & Adversity: How Racism Affects Mental and Physical Health

Date:  Wednesday, January 22nd , 2019   7:30‐9:30 PM

Location:   OMA Offices, 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 900, Toronto

Speaker: Dr. Onye Nnorom

Physicians, Residents and Medical Students welcome

Cost: Free

Hosted by the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

Please register with Ada/Anna at pcmhsection@gmail.com􏰀  or

416‐229‐2399 Ext 125.

Approved for 2 hours of MDPAC Group CE credits

 

Learning Objectives:
By the end of the session participants will be able to:
1. Understand how systemic racism acts as a social determinant of health in Canada
2. Describe the different ways in which racism can affect mental and physical health
3. Discuss how experiences of subtle racism (micro‐aggressions) can be traumatic for patient

 

Dr. Onye Nnorom is a Family Doctor and a Public Health & Preventive Medicine specialist. She practices at TAIBU Community Health Centre, in Toronto, which has a mandate to serve the Black community in the Greater Toronto Area. She is the Primary Care Lead for Cancer Care Ontario’s Central East Regional Cancer Program, providing leadership on matters of cancer prevention and care to primary care physicians in the region.

She is also the Associate Program Director of the Public Health & Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the University of Toronto. She recently took on the position as the Black Health Theme Lead for the Faculty of Medicine, incorporating Black Canadian health issues into the medical school curriculum.

Dr. Nnorom completed her medical degree at McGill University, and then completed a Masters of Public Health (Epidemiology) and residency training at the University of Toronto. Being of Nigerian and Trinidadian heritage, she is particularly interested in racism and its impacts on the health of Black and other racialized/immigrant groups in Canada. She is the President and Board Chair of the Black Physicians’ Association of Ontario.

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Resilience: Beyond the Hype and Towards an Attitude of Hope

Caring for Self while Caring for Others Series

Date : January 16,2019

Time: 7:30-9:30 pm. – Please arrive early so that we can start on time.

Location: OMA Offices, 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 900 (NE corner of Bloor &Avenue Road)

Speakers:  Harry Zeit MD and Irina Dumitrache CYT 

Cost: No charge, courtesy of the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

Please RSVP by phone to: 416-229-2399, ext 125 ( Ada or Anna), or via e-mail to: michaelpare@rogers.com.

For inquiries only about the Caring for Self series, contact Dr. Harry Zeit at harryzeit@sympatico.ca.      

 

In the field of clinician wellness and health, other than self-care, no term has been as utilized – and perhaps of late demonized – than resilience. We know that resilience is important. We may carry some ideas and pre-conceptions of what it means to be resilient. Yet of late, on social media and in medical blogs, more and more physicians note that the word carries connotations of blame and associations with systems that exploit and abuse. Too many speakers and institutions, capitalizing on need and distress, have offered resilience programs that are ineffectual, or that hold attendees accountable when they continue to suffer symptoms.

Most physicians (and many other health care providers) understand that the system is broken and ultimately requires a radical revisioning and re-organization. Our most courageous leaders and writers remind us that no amount of resilience training can sustain us within a system that is ultimately unsustainable and that traumatizes and overwhelms both providers and patients. So, is there any reason to continue to re-visit resilience and to cultivate skills and practices that build and deepen our ability to withstand and recover from adversity?

Are there teachings and practices within the resilience field that can serve us and protect us to a certain extent from the pitfalls we face – including committing medical errors, quitting our work prematurely, addiction, chronic illness and family breakdown? Can we create a core of calm and strength, through practice and awareness, that can insulate us from worst-case scenarios? If a critical mass of providers can adopt this deeper, more meaningful connection to resilience, will a natural movement to challenging the system also begin to form?

 

Objectives:

Attendees will :

Learn resilience practices aimed at reducing the deleterious effects of unremitting stress and overwhelm.

Gain an understanding of the factors that lead to creating new resilience resources that are lasting and adaptable.

Acquire new knowledge on the importance of moving from stress physiology to states of safety, calm and connection.

Practice several exercises designed to deepen, embody and integrate states of resilience.

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“Managing Difficult Clinical Encounters i.e. ‘The Angry Patient”

Date: Thursday, December 13, 2018
7:30pm – 9:30pm

Location: OMA Offices, 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 900, Toronto, ON

Speaker:   Dr. Michael Cord, HBSc, M.D,CATPP (TPS), MCFP

 

To register, please contact Ada/Anna at pcmhsection@gmail.com or (416)229-2399 Ext 125.

Approved for 2 hours of MDPAC Group CE Credits

 

Who is invited: All Physicians, Residents, and Medical Students
Registration: Free for all Physicians, Residents, and Medical Students, hosted by the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

This talk is free of charge and hosted by the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health.

Dr. Michael Cord, M.D. is a family physician with a practice focused on psychotherapy and psychotherapy supervision. He supervises colleagues beginning therapy practice for the CPSO Change of Scope program, is a Mentor within the OCFP Collaborative Mental Health Network (CMHN) and a psychotherapy Supervisor for the Mount Sinai Psychotherapy Institute.

During this session, you will:
1. Understand how the “intense clinical moment” evolves.
2. Understand the risks involved.
3. Understand the most common clinical responses to difficult physician-patient encounters.
4. Learn to manage such difficulties in order to manage risk and provide benefit for the patient.
5. Learn to recognize one’s own emotional reactions to the patient in a difficult interaction.
6. Learn to “metabolize” the intensity of difficult clinical encounters.
7. Learn to use one’s emotional reactions to a difficult encounter to respond professionally.

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What do We Know About Burnout and Traumatic Stress in 2018 ? 

 

What do We Know About Burnout and Traumatic Stress in 2018 ?

(That we didn’t know in 2016)

Date :  November 21, 2018

Location: OMA Offices, 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 900 (NE corner of Bloor & Avenue Road)

Time: 7:30-9:30 PM – Please arrive early so that we can start on time.

Cost: No charge, courtesy of the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health

Please RSVP by phone to: 416-229-2399, ext 125 ( Ada or Anna), or via e-mail to: michaelpare@rogers.com.

For inquiries only about the Caring for Self series, contact Dr. Harry Zeit at harryzeit@sympatico.ca

Please visit our supporting Facebook page and community at : https://www.facebook.com/WhileCaringForOthers/

Conversations about burnout, clinician well-being and the effects of toxic stress increasingly dominate discussions within the health care field. These crucial conversations exist on many levels, from the physiologic and individual, to the collective and political.

Sometimes the conversation is about medical errors, and sometimes it is about clinician suicides. There are many faces to this contemporary dialogue, and most of them share tragedy and a sense of collective helplessness and bewilderment as a common thread.

We last summed up the state of knowledge and awareness of burnout in season four of our series. We felt that this year – with discussion on burnout and moral injury so much in the forefront – that we revisit the topic and summarize what advances and shifts we’ve observed in this rapidly evolving area.

In this presentation, attendees will learn:

A more holistic approach that integrates the embodied, subjective and social environment

About advances in understanding the relationship between subcortical neurophysiology, burnout and trauma

More about why burnout, behavioural sequelae and addiction reflect traumatic stress and not depression.

How conversations about burnout cannot take place without a deeper understanding of moral injury, betrayal theory and dignity.

Barriers to the implementation of effective responses to the burnout and moral injury crisis.

 

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Caring for your Patient-What not ! to do

Women’s College Hospital and the Education Committee of the OMA Section on Primary Care Mental Health are pleased to present this Program free of charge:

Presenters:  Dr. Lynn Marshall, M.D. and other members of MDPAC Guidelines Task Force

Time:  Wednesday  October 24, 2018     7:30-9:30 pm 

Location: Women’s College Hospital room 6214  (6th Floor)

Please RSVP to Ada and Anna at michaelpare@rogers.com or 416-229-2399 x 125

A collaborative video by the Guidelines Task Force of the MD Psychotherapy Association of Canada (Drs.Carol Brock, Larry Nusbaum, Joan Barr, Lynn Marshall, Karyn Klapecki), followed by discussion with the audience. The program will finish with a song by Dr. Larry Nusbaum, dedicated to the late Dr. David Cree.

The goals are: to re-emphasize what TO DO as physicians practising high quality psychotherapy, based on medical ethics that allows for a variety of approaches, and focuses on maintaining professional development. The objectives are to focus on what NOT TO DO regarding competence, conduct, and environment/record-keeping.

 

Come up to the 6th Floor via the Main elevators from the parking garage or lobby. Turn left, go though the door and room 6214 is directly on your right.

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